Our Mission

"Snow Leopard biologist, Shannon Kachel, and veterinarians, John Ochsenreiter and Ric Berlinski, collaring male at night, Sarychat-Ertash Strict Nature Reserve, Tien Shan Mountains, eastern Kyrgyzstan"
SNOW LEOPARD BIOLOGIST SHANNON KACHEL AND VETERINARIANS JOHN OCHSENREITER AND RIC BERLINSKI, COLLARING A MALE AT NIGHT. SARYCHAT-ERTASH STRICT NATURE RESERVE, TIEN SHAN MOUNTAINS, EASTERN KYRGYZSTAN.
© sebastian kennerknecht

Panthera is devoted exclusively to the conservation of the world’s 40 wild cat species and their ecosystems.

Read our latest Annual Report
Read our latest Annual Report

Using the expertise of the world’s premier cat biologists, Panthera develops and implements global strategies for the seven species of big cats: cheetahs, leopards, jaguars, lions, pumas (also known as mountain lions or cougars), snow leopards and tigers. Panthera also studies and protects the world's most threatened species of small cats through our Small Cats Program. 

Representing the most comprehensive effort of its kind, Panthera partners with local and international NGOs, scientific institutions, local communities and governments around the globe and citizens who want to help ensure a future for wild cats.

Mission: Ensure a future for wild cats and the vast landscapes on which they depend.

Vision: A world where wild cats thrive in healthy, natural and developed landscapes that sustain people and biodiversity.

"Mother lion and her cubs within the bushes"
© paul funston / panthera

Why Cats?

The presence of wild cats — our landscape guardians — indicate healthy, intact ecosystems that support all life, including people around the world.

Panthera's core programs focus on implementing conservation strategies for some of the world’s most threatened large cats: tigers, lions, jaguars, snow leopards, cheetahs, pumas and leopards. Our scientists also implement conservation and research initiatives on many of the 33 smaller wild cat species around the globe. 

While Panthera’s efforts are focused on saving wild cats, the impacts go far beyond.